Beware Donating to Collectibles with Causes

Keen readers will notice my last blog post discussed parting ways with my beloved comic book collection. I painstakingly entered each book first into a spreadsheet and then into an online database. If I’d carefully packaged and sold the lot, spread out into a hundred or so auctions, I probably could have received $5,000 or so.

Collectibles With Causes Legit? Unknown. Sketchy? Yes.

Collectibles with Causes, also known as With Causes, Works of Life International Ministries, and dozens of other names, is a charity that accepts collectibles, sells them, and then uses proceeds for good works, When I found them in August 2014, I did my research, like any good donator would. While I found nothing indicating proceeds would be used for hateful/exclusive causes, their EIN (26-0903224) appeared in neither the California nor the USA register of charities. I called the IRS and they confirmed that they had no record of their non-profit standing. Furthermore, none of the charity rating services have an entry for them. Not a deal-killer, but cause for concern.

The only third-party mention of With Causes/Works of Life I could find pertains to their Christmas 2011 gift of a house to a large family whose house had just burned down. Here’s an article/video. Works of Life is still milking it; one of their most recent (2014) Tumblr posts gives a shout-out to this same charitable effort.

Nonetheless, I was attracted to Collectibles With Causes. I really liked the idea of a win-win-win. I get a tax write-off for my comics and don’t need to spend dozens of hours selling them. The charity sells them and my beloved comic books find new, loving homes. Finally, people benefit from the good works/proceeds of the sale. Three wins–at least! But is it too good to be true?

Communication Problems

Collectibles with Causes might not want to reimburse your shipping expenses even when you follow their instructions.
Collectibles with Causes might not want to reimburse your shipping expenses–even if you follow their instructions.

I sent them the details of my donation on September 3, 2014 and received a canned response thanking me, providing shipping instructions, shipping reimbursement instructions, and other information. I asked for clarification on 9/7/14. On 9/9/14 I still hadn’t received a response so I pinged them again. Later in the day, no response forthcoming, I called them. Ginger finally checked the info@withcauses.org inbox and responded.

Five days later, on 9/16/14, I shipped eight boxes/about 280 pounds of comic books to:

Works of Life
ATTN: Collectibles with Causes
1175 Shaw Avenue #104-135
Clovis, California  93612

Their canned reply mentioned that, “The best method for shipping a volume of comics is USPS PARCEL POST or MEDIA MAIL …costing only approx $25.00 per long box and less than half of that for a short box.” Alas, you’re unable to ship anything with advertising via media mail. (Newsflash: comics have ads.) The plot sickens: USPS Standard Post (known as Parcel Post, until May 2007,) is much more expensive than $25/box. My shipping bill totaled $484.49. I sent them the original receipt as requested.

I notified them of the shipping cost and problems with media mail, and asked them how long it would take to get reimbursed the large shipping outlay. Amazingly, I got a reply the same day, 9/18/14, “Shipping is reimbursed once we receive your books and the shipping receipt. I will let you know once the books arrive.”

Tracking information let me know that the books arrived on 9/26/14. Ginger did NOT let me know. I sent an email on 9/29/14 asking if the books arrived. No response. I sent another email on 10/8/14 asking for an update on shipping reimbursement. No response. On 10/27/14, I emailed again. No response. (I should note that I called a couple of times in that month-long period too.) I then called on 10/28/14 and was told Ginger no longer worked there and that I’d receive a call back in a couple of days. That didn’t happen.

I called on 11/3/14, and they’re now apparently reluctant to reimburse shipping, because actual expenses don’t gel with the dream-world figures in their horribly out-of-date canned response. They asked me to scan and send another copy of the receipt. I did. Again, they said they’d get back to me. …24+ hours later, I’m not holding my breath.

Is Collectibles With Causes as Scam?

I’m not sure if Collectibles with Causes is a scam. …They might just suffer from personnel and communication problems.

If I don’t receive shipping reimbursement within a week I will contact the California Attorneys General, the BBB, the IRS, their local news media, and anybody else I can think of. I’ll pass along every bit of information I have about Works of Life and how they’ve (so far) reneged on the implied contract presented on their website, in their emails, and via phone. …I’m pretty sure that’s a crime. They are messing with the wrong dude.

I strongly urge you to find another charity for your donation. I will revise this review if they eventually make things right.

Update:

It’s 11/17/2014. After nearly two months staying on them, I have a shipping reimbursement check in hand. (They paid up!) Did this blog post have anything to do with it? I don’t know.

If you’re going to incur considerable postage expenses when you ship something to any With Causes charity, note that you might have to wait and/or fight for reimbursement. If I had to do it all over again, I’d donate to a local charity instead. Lesson learned.

Update:

2/16/2015:  Very unofficial response from alleged former Collectibles with Causes volunteer is in comments. While it’s entertaining, I smile more when I read my response to it. Enjoy.

Update:

1/30/2017:  Somebody claiming to be Cameron Arballo from Works of Life called both my wife’s and sister’s places of employment and left threatening messages saying that he knows where she lives. Conveniently, these conversations were recorded. I’m giving them to the police.

Dan Dreifort is a professional part-time complainer. (In lieu of donations, send his wife earplugs.) He consults on web optimization and usability for fun.

Selling my comic books :(

forlorn-supesFile under boring, self-serving blog posts.

After more decades than I care to admit, I’m finally moving to another state and I don’t plan to haul my comic books with me.

1,679 comic books spanning more than 60 years.

This little link comics-for-sale-all takes you to a spreadsheet listing them all. Sort it as you will. Don’t judge me. Please share with comic collectors you know. I’m currently only looking for offers on the entire collection.

I’m willing to take a huge loss selling the collection in one fell swoop, but if I don’t get a good offer, I’ll sell the 100 or so most valuable comics individually on eBay and then donate the rest.

If you want me to expand this post to discuss materialism, letting go, and a history of lists–let me know 😉

Pizza Poem

pizza
Avalanche Pizza’s Pesto Chicken Pizza

A member of my stalwart Wednesday evening badminton crew introduced me to fifty cent slice night at a local pizzeria. It reminded me of a pizza poem I wrote circa 1998. I think it’s a metaphor, or something.

I ate a slice of it for lunch
I’d like to have some more
I can not get enough, you see
I am the pizza whore

To eat a slice is not a sin
To waste one is a crime
I think I ate too much today
I do it all the time

And if the oceans ceased to crash
And the sun did cease to rise
I’d sit back and gorge my huge fat ass
On a million pizza pies

Flying Mantra adapted parts of this ode into a song we affectionately called, “Serpentine”. Excerpt available here.

Looking for the best Hawaii digital marketing agency

I fired a Hawaii marketing agency a couple of months ago. I was not a client. I’d been providing usability and SEO services to their clients since 2007. (Does that mean I quit?) I grew online business for a few of their big-name clients and received decent money for it. Everybody at the agency was polite and skilled. So why did I fire them? Throughout the six-year engagement they paid several hundred invoices, but rarely on time. I fired them because they regularly forced me to act as an accountant and a collections agent.

Glutton For Digital Media Agency Punishment

Hawaii Destination Marketing SEO and a Beach
I heart Hawaii !

A few weeks later I was approached by another Hawaii digital marketing outfit. I’m not hungry for work now, but with so much SEO and usability experience in the Hawaii destination and hospitality verticals, part of me wants to put that knowledge to good use. So when this new agency reached out to me, I engaged.

I insist on signing a mutual non-disclosure agreement with all clients. The NDA serves to protect any private information and ostensibly allows us to discuss anything without worry of public eyes and ears. After a month of wasting my time, this new agency today tells me, “We can’t sign this.” I tried to identify and fix the perceived problem, but after receiving a couple more obtuse emails, I eventually jabbed, “I take my clients’ privacy very seriously. If [Agency] doesn’t respect that, we’re obviously not a good match.” I sent a friendly “goodbye” note to his partner.

I assure you I won’t be communicating with them again unless we agree about privacy.

What I’ve learned:

  • Fool me once, shame on, um… how does that go, George Bush? Fire clients more quickly if/when they’re late with payments.
  • Don’t invest too much speculative time with clients until they agree to protect privacy.
  • I’d again like to help a Hawaii company or agency with search engine optimization and user experience.
  • I *still* don’t like time-wasters.
Dan Dreifort‘s current clients include: Product recommendation SaaS company, Plastic container manufacturer/retailer, Adjustable air-mattress retailer/manufacturer, Memory foam mattress manufacturer/retailer, Specialty shipping company, Brazilian jiu jitsu franchises, Tourist magazine, Childcare franchises, Acting school, Real estate brokers, Lawyer, Fence manufacturer/retailer, Online drug rehab center and a couple more. Dan is busy and can’t accept new work until January, 2014.

A Post About Droste

pre-droste
Nice, but needs some cropping.

(In which our amateur blogger plays the role of self-aggrandizing art critic.)

Always bad web-form to refer to something that might soon change, but see that banner up there? It’s a Droste effect applied to a picture I took in NYC on September 21, 2001, just ten days after 911. My digital camera (a Fuji Finepix) served me well at the time, but its 640 x 480 output pales and pixelates next to even the cheapest digital cameras available today. Still, I really like that picture.

Not even worthy of Droste!
No flash?!

I didn’t use a flash for the first snap of this picture. In it the chain link fence looks cold and constraining, confining and defining the entire composition. How ironic then, that illuminating the foreground barrier really delivered a sense of openness? This is the first and last time I’ll display it. You’re welcome.

The one I Drosted.
Much better. (2001)

Shortly after my trip to post-911 New York, I started doctoring the w/flash-version of the picture. First I cropped it. That looked nice enough, got rid of some extraneous color palette (who needs trees anyhow?) and provided subjective focus. It’s in this phase that I came to call the picture “Jung Gym” for what may be obvious pun-inspired reasons. But cropping wasn’t enough.

Banksy? Meh.

It's a mugshot.
Banksy, eat your heart out.

Next on the image doctoring docket, a pass through what looks like a Photoshop cutout filter with some selective digital hand painting wherein the artist introduces fresh, bold color to the ensemble. Enamored by this piece, I tacked on my dotcom-du-jour brand and slapped the would-be commercial art on a coffee mug. It has not sold well. A dozen years later, it’s still available. Buy your uncool mug today.

Recursion, pre-Droste
Is that recursion?

Still haunted by this lo-fi image of a fence partly obscuring a jungle gym in front of a building, I immediately modded it again. This iteration, while not a true Droste, includes elements of recursion, no doubt planting the seed for future self-similar expression experimentation. What does that mean? When I look at this throwaway sketch, I see the seeds of my journey into Droste effects.

I thought this was a post about Droste?

Droste Jung Gym
Yes, it’s a Droste. (2010)

So, back to the banner on top of every page of DanDreifort.com; it’s a Drosted version of this “Jung Gym” picture wherein we replicate the original introducing near-infinite recursion. It’s not really infinite, silly. That’s impossible. We can only hint at it. Hell, instead of referring to that banner (that might go away someday,) I’ll just post the full version of that and erase the bit where I asked future reader noticing the absence of said banner to tell me to post that image over to the right. See it there? That’s why I make the big bucks.

Droste images thumbnail
Click for a selection of Droste effect images

Fast-forward to September 2009: My Sony Elph digital camera is a little better and there exists a plugin for The GIMP called MathMap. Pair the two with moderate investment in time and elbow grease and voilà! Pixel pushers the world ’round are able to create myriad mergings of art and math. For me, that meant the ability to create Droste effect images. I’ll offer only one more thumbnail image here. Clicking it, just like the following hyper-linked text, will take you to a selection of Dan Dreifort Droste effect efforts, displayed in chronological order. Enjoy!

Do you want a personalized Droste effect image? Tell me. Maybe we can work something out.

Robocalls Are Easy To Fix

English: A Fox 40 whistle from the late 1980s.
A Fox 40 whistle from the late 1980s. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Because it’s still relevant, I’ll leave my initial robocall fix idea below. But I’ve had some time to think about robocalls for a few years and I have a better idea.

Charge for every call.

Find some amount. I’d like to make it high, like a penny. One measly cent. But others have arguments to make it smaller, like a tenth of a cent. Either way, making the origination of a call actually cost something would be a game-changer. It would help to stop spam. At scale, even a tenth of a cent is daunting.

If the cost itself wasn’t an effective barrier, the potential to follow the money would maybe scare some spammers off.

Anyhow. I’ll leave my late-2019 addition there. On to the original idea from 6+ years ago.

In early November I received my umpteenth call from Rachel at cardholder services. A few years ago I wasted time filing FTC reports on these jokers in a wholly ineffective effort to thwart their incessant nagging. Of late I’ve instead taken to passive aggressively nagging them back.

How I Used to Deal With Rachel and her Cardholder Services Minions

This time, as is now my custom, I pressed whatever number would get me to a consultant to discuss the urgent scam relating to my credit cards. I then pressed mute and walked away. A few minutes later, per my routine, I picked up the phone to hang it up, but this time there’s a guy whispering all sorts of awesome stuff still on the line. So I listened for a while. He’d just started at his call center job two weeks earlier and had yet to get any training. He was bitching about the people near him and how backwards and horrible everybody and everything about his job was. Very entertaining. (He was using more colorful language than I’m willing to recount here.)

I wanted to un-mute and talk to him but decided not to. What would I have said? “Become a whistle-blower!” These $#%^ing phone spammers are breaking the law and I’d love to see some convictions. Unfortunately I (and likely most call center drones) are unaware of incentive to blow the whistle on such illegal activity, if any even exists.

FTC Robocall Challenge to the Rescue?

The FTC is planning to spend serious dough on “new and innovative ways to block these illegal calls,” and is soliciting fresh ideas via the U.S.A.’s official challenge website. They’re also offering $50,000 in prizes for challenge winners. But I recognize problems with most of the submissions. They’re either ineffective, costly, unproven, violate basic privacy or show other weaknesses. Solving this problem is as simple as the American dream itself and it’s a bargain too.

Incentivize Whistleblowers

From aforementioned breathy undertones of the underbelly of the robocall world, I was able to infer that call center workers are overworked, underpaid, shown little respect and mistreated. What if we offered cash rewards for proof of illegal telemarketing activity? How much would it take? I’m guessing not much.

What person working at a thankless illegal job is going to turn down a four figure reward for ten minutes of work? IT WILL WORK. But how will we fund it? While there’s likely already a budget for this sort of thing, I understand that taxing and spending isn’t sexy these days and that we’re to rely on the private sector for things like… money. (?!)

I’ll start. If I win the challenge, I’ll donate 10% of my take to an FTC telemarketing whistle blower fund.

Won’t you join me? (Boring details for my FTC challenge submission follow. Thanks for reading!)

Project Details FAQ

Q: What is required to stop robocalls and encourage whistleblowers?

A: Funding. A website to field scam reports. Small staff to review reports. Initial marketing push.

Q: What about robocalls that don’t provide an option to speak to a human?

A: There are still underpaid minions in these shady organizations. We can turn them from the dark side.

Q: What about robocalls from other countries?

A: People in other countries like cash too. We can turn them and stop the flow of robocalls.

Q: Harumph! I hate government spending! What else would we need to crowdsource the funding?

A: If the gov doesn’t have the ability to do it already, hire somebody to use free, off the shelf, open source scripts to accept donations. Initial marketing push.

When he’s not traveling or making music, Dan Dreifort likes to consult on search and usability. Dan also likes his wife even though she has neglected him for almost four years while she’s been at veterinary school. She comes back in three weeks. Dan is very happy about this.

A Long Acronym

 

I enjoy a good acronym or three. (correction: initialism, not acronym)

WOUB.org is putting the finishing touches on an article about my latest musical endeavor which is only relevant here because I strung three acronyms together this morning while politely refusing to stream one of my old songs along with the article.

“Naturally, if you just want it for personal use, I’d be happy to hook you with an OSJB OMG MP3”

To be fair, WOUB reporter Elliot Nicolson started the acronym abuse!

“Polishing up the Leave Corp article now. I was wondering, would it be possible that you send me an mp3 of Oh My God by OSJB?”

I wrote that song (OMG,) when I was 17, almost 22 years ago, just one short year after I finished my longest acronym.

C’mon. I dare you. Find a longer acronym, punk!

You won’t find it at AcronymFinder.com, but when I was a kid my friend and I would try to memorize really long acronyms of nonsensical pop culture phrases. I think I won when I could recite this doozy –

OMPYPPAEBFDWFDYMAHHCJBCHTPMPILISBCDCSDTDJL
OMDYACKKKJDTBCJBLOODYXTBGCOGODIDTDODAFNDO
TKOBRTBYGD

…Not saying I could do it in one breath, but I did it! I’m not going to bother counting that now, but according to 16-year-old me, that was a 94 character acronym.

I don’t know what all of it stands for, but here’s what I remember, (with the lost-to-us parts in parens.)

Osculate my posterior you pre-pubescent anal excretion. Big f*ckin’ deal. Whoopy f*ckin’ doo. Your mother and her howling commandos. (WBCHTP) My pistol is loaded. I shot Betty Crocker. Deliver Colonel Sanders down to Davey Jones’ locker. Ohio Meadville District Youth-Adult Committee.  (KKKJDTBCJBLOODYX) The black glove cult of gynecologists of death. (IDTDODAFNFO) The kingdom of big Rankin tape. (BYGD)

But what does it MEAN?!

Nothing.

Some of it is self-explanatory, like that first bit, which is long-winded douche-speak for, “Kiss my *ss you little sh*t.”

YMAHHC, (acronym pronounced Y-M-A-double-H-C) was my first band, named after a similarly named comic book.  The main character, Sgt. Nick Fury, is also the head of, S.H.I.E.L.D. Acronym coincidence? I think not.

Any hipster worth their salt will recognize a line from the Beastie Boys’ License to Ill, and I was an active member of the OMD-YAC, a Unitarian Universalist conference planning group.

Worst Fencing Club Name Ever

The Black Glove Cult of GOD was my fencing team. We each wore a single black glove and quickly got in trouble for our inappropriate name after posting flyers after-hours all over the high school. The mini-posters depicted a black glove surrounded by text, “The Black Glove Cult of G.O.D. – Join our ranks.”

School administration was certain beloved Shaker Heights High School had been infiltrated by a cult. They called an emergency early morning teacher meeting the next day for triage damage control wherein our honors English  teacher exclaimed, “Some kids in my class wear black gloves!”  We had to take down all of our flyers. 😦

TKOBRT is more convoluted. Mr. Rankin was an honors chemistry teacher. The tape was a roll of duct tape, duct-taped to the side of a bus in West Germany. The Kingdom consisted of band nerds on said bus. All kingdom dwellers got their own fancy title. I did NOT earn “Minister of Chill” but co-opted that title for my first business cards a decade later. TKOBRT even had a battle hymn/fight song. (With apologies to Alice Cooper.)

I wanna hit you with a really big stick. (BIG STICK!)
I wanna poke your eyes out with my favorite pocket knife. (POCKET KNIFE!)
Cuz you’re poison running through my veins.
I can’t stand the site of your brains.
You’re poison. And you smell bad too. I hate you.

I wrote none of that awesome garbage but I’m guilty of remembering it.

Dan Dreifort will be a bachelor for only another month or so, ladies. You missed your chance. For you, he would have recited an even longer acronym. Dan Dreifort makes little changes to companies’ websites to make those companies more money. He will be first against the wall come the revolution.

 

New Buckyballs Shape – Tetrahedron

No juggalo, I like playing with magnets.

Fun with magnets

A friend gave me a Ball of Whacks a few years ago. I played with them so much, my special lady friend threatened to leave me the next time I said, “Hey babe, look at this weird shape I made!”

Buckyballs are great fun for creative fingers. I made this tetrahedron shape in 2011 and looked around to see if anybody else had done it. Nope. Almost a year has passed since I recorded the video above. Time to share it with the world. Has anybody else recorded proof of the buckyballs “3 sided pyramid” shape in the past year? I hope not. It’s getting more and more difficult to appear as if I have fresh ideas.

I’ll take the tiny creativity victories.

Inadvertent Lessons from Safety Town

Under a Blanket of Sleep

My earliest memories fluttered archetypal dreamscapes of unknowable shapes and otherworldly sounds. I remember not understanding the recurring dream, confusion which no doubt rooted the subtle cerement of fear shrouding this fascinating fancy. That I lacked adequate language to describe it frustrated me more than my inability to understand it.

Dan Dreifort 1976
No, it’s not a little girl. It’s our intrepid rememberer at a USA bicentennial parade.

Well, I still don’t get it and my words still don’t do it justice, but my next-oldest set of memories are mundane enough to recount here without feelings of inadequacy. Like most memories of early childhood, these gems exist only because of unintentional mnemonics.

I likely remember the USA bicentennial Independence Day parade because there’s photographic evidence I attended the event. I saw those “Happy 200th USA” pictures in 1976, 1977, 1978 and so on, every time I opened the family photo album. The requisite bright colors, explosions, and yummy charred meat in tube form might have seared something into my noggin too, but without photographs to jog my memory you wouldn’t be reading about it now. (Sorry!)

If a bear tells a story in the woods and nobody hears it, does it make a sound?

The narrative is another way we cheat the long forgetting. One of my earlier memories surely exists because I heard about it repeatedly and then repeated the tale thusly.

The babysitter put me to bed in my crib. All’s well, until some pother of hullabaloo caused her to enter my room a short time later. Feathers filled the air.  Through the feathery haze she cried, “What happened?!”

“My pillow hit me, so I hit it back.” I said.

Or so the story goes. I’m sure I first heard that story when my parents recounted it to somebody shortly thereafter. I heard it again a few years later when I asked, “Mom, Dad, why are there little feathers in the carpet in my bedroom?” Then I took the storytelling torch and ran with it every time a friend asked about the teeny snow-like feathers mashed into the blue Berber carpet acting as the floor of the rebel fortress on the ice planet of Hoth as we played with Star Wars figures in my room.

Mnemonicless Memories of Safety Town

So what should we call the first memories of waking life we store without story or photo aid? I’m tempted to use words like “pure” but my episodic memory isn’t what it used to be, so we’ll just say they’re unaided or mnemonicless memories. An unintentional lesson from Safety Town might be my earliest, cohesive, unaided memory.

Safety Town, for the uninitiated, teaches preschool children about life on the streets. Here’s a (dead) link to the Safety Town I attended where I learned about safety on the sidewalks and streets of suburbia. I think I remember kids riding Big Wheels around a marked course, acting as ersatz cars while numerous police officers watched over us. Safer, I suppose, than letting a bunch of idiot kids run loose in the streets to learn via trial and error with real cars.

This one time, at Safety Town

Surrounded by counselors and cops, a man walks among us distributing candy from a large container. “Would you like some candy?”

“You’re damn right I like me some candy,” is probably what I thought as I nabbed some sugary goodness with my grubby kid hands.

One of the many police officers then lined up all of the kids. “If you took candy, step forward,” he said. I and most of the other children took a few steps. “Now, turn around and hand all of your candy to somebody behind you.”

“What the f#*%?!” is what I might have said had my vocabulary been more, um, mature.

Obviously the lesson was, “Don’t take candy from strangers.” But what I took home that day was something along the lines of, “Don’t trust old people who take your candy.” Or “The police aren’t capable of protecting you, even if you’re standing next to them.” Or whatever. @$$holes took my mother#*%ing candy.

To this day I’m more likely to accept candy from a stranger than to think the police are going to protect me from harm. Candy is awesome.  1979 Safety Town can suck it. Safety Town, are you paying attention? Change your curriculum, if you haven’t already.

What other sorts of memory mnemonics are there? Is there a song that carries you to a specific place and time? Every time I hear “Happy Birthday” I think of my birthday. What a great song. Thanks for reading.

 
When not mangling memories, Dan Dreifort consults on search and usability and makes music with his band LEAVE CORP. He recently founded SLACK, Summer League Adult Co-Ed Kickball and is doing yoga for the first time tonight. Dan Dreifort is a notary public and a marriage officiant. Dan is also for scuba.

Cat Food New Flavors

The Itchy & Scratchy Game
Itchy & Scratchy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Staring at the Oven Roasted Chicken Flavor DENTAL TREATS cats love! AKA Feline Greenies (TM), I pondered yet another in a long line of unoriginal thoughts: Why do we feed cats food flavored for humans?

The answer is two-fold.

1. We do not. Well, I’m reasonably sure we’re not feeding our cats food that’s flavored to please a human. That is to say, while I haven’t tried one of the crunchy green treats, I’m confident that it tastes nothing like Oven Roasted Chicken.

2. Regardless, the cat has no money. It doesn’t go shopping. They’re trying to sell the treats to crazy cat lady (played by me in this episode,) not her cat.

So everything makes sense again in our consumer happy world. You know, the one in which we US residents alone literally spend billions of dollars annually on our pets. Or does it?

Suggestions for new flavors of cat treats

  • Mouse – Duh. It’s a cat classic. Mouse flavored cat food is a no-brainer. Tom and Jerry. Herman and Katnip. Itchy and Scratchy. Your cat wants to vicariously live the adventures of those famous cat/mouse duos with every bite.
  • Baby Bunny – Rabbits are the potato chip of the wild kingdom. They eat, they make those pellets, they sleep, they breed, they breed, they breed, and then they die – usually at the fangs of some hungry predator. And let’s face it, they’re none too smart, so most of them don’t even make it to adulthood. Or maybe, just maybe, baby bunnies just taste better. Yeah, we’ll go with that. Cat’s love munching on fresh baby bunny.
  • Moth and Butterfly Surprise – If you own both butterfly bush and feline, you know that delish comes from a chrysalis. That’s poetic license for: Cats like to eat butterflies. These tasty cat treats could have an appealing butterfly shape. You know, for kids!
  • Wasabi Soy Sparrow – The sparrow, better known as feline sushi, pairs wonderfully with a little wasabi and soy. Add a dash of pickled ginger to clear the palate between bites. Your little kitty just loves eating birds.
  • Crunchy Vole Surprise – Put a cat in a room with a single mouse and a single vole, and 90% of the time that cat’s going to head for the mouse first. Vole treats can be marketed to cats with a more discerning palate. Your cat is too good for mouse flavored food. Let those commoner alley cats eat the mice. I’m a classy cat. I only eat vole.
Dan Dreifort takes a pill every day to control cat allergies. When he’s not writing about idealized cat treats he consults on usability, SEO, efficiency, and anything  else techy marketing-ish people want to know.